Trivia

In between caring about the eyesight of humans, we are also science geeks and enjoy learning about the eyesight of other animals and insects that share this world with us. We recently came across this video from Animalism and The Atlantic Magazine about how animals see the world and we thought it worth sharing with you.

We hope you enjoy it as much as we did.

 

How Animals See the World

Animals evolved eyes in incredibly diverse ways and for different purposes. But if all animals aren’t using their eyes to see, what do they use them for? And what’s the biological difference between hawk eyes and fish eyes?

Posted by Animalism on Monday, November 6, 2017

Seems everyone is getting very excited for the coming complete solar eclipse on Monday, August 21st at 1:47 PM. The Denver area is 152 miles from seeing the total eclipse, so you better plan on a crowded trip up I-25 to Casper, Wyoming if you want to see the sun totally blocked out. The Denver area will be just over 92% blocked out at the height of the eclipse. Colorado Springs will be just under 89% eclipsed. Do you want to see the eclipse?

DO NOT LOOK DIRECTLY INTO THE SUN…. even during an eclipse!

Here are a few tips we gathered from NASA as to how to look at an eclipse.

A solar eclipse occurs when the moon blocks any part of the sun. On Monday, August 21, 2017, a solar eclipse will be visible (weather permitting) across all of North America. The whole continent will experience a partial eclipse lasting 2 to 3 hours. Halfway through the event, anyone within a roughly 70-mile-wide path from Oregon to South Carolina will experience a brief total eclipse, when the moon completely blocks the sun’s bright face for up to 2 minutes 40 seconds, turning day into night and making visible the otherwise hidden solar corona — the sun’s outer atmosphere — one of nature’s most awesome sights. Bright stars and planets will become visible as well.

 

The only safe way to look directly at the uneclipsed or partially eclipsed sun is through special-purpose solar filters, such as “eclipse glasses” (example shown at left) or hand-held solar viewers. Homemade filters or ordinary sunglasses, even very dark ones, are not safe for looking at the sun. To date five manufacturers have certified that their eclipse glasses and handheld solar viewers meet the ISO 12312-2 international standard for such products: American Paper Optics, Baader Planetarium (AstroSolar Silver/Gold film only), Rainbow Symphony, Thousand Oaks Optical, and TSE 17.
  • Do not look at the uneclipsed or partially eclipsed sun through an unfiltered camera, telescope, binoculars, or other optical device. Similarly, do not look at the sun through a camera, a telescope, binoculars, or any other optical device while using your eclipse glasses or hand-held solar viewer — the concentrated solar rays will damage the filter and enter your eye(s), causing serious injury. Seek expert advice from an astronomer before using a solar filter with a camera, a telescope, binoculars, or any other optical device.
  • If you are within the path of totality (https://go.nasa.gov/2pC0lhe), remove your solar filter only when the Moon completely covers the sun’s bright face and it suddenly gets quite dark. Experience totality, then, as soon as the bright sun begins to reappear, replace your solar viewer to glance at the remaining partial phases.

An alternative method for safe viewing of the partially eclipsed sun is pinhole projection. For example, cross the outstretched, slightly open fingers of one hand over the outstretched, slightly open fingers of the other. With your back to the sun, look at your hands’ shadow on the ground. The little spaces between your fingers will project a grid of small images on the ground, showing the sun as a crescent during the partial phases of the eclipse.

Want to see what the eclipse will look like from your zip code? Click this great link from Vox.

As we approach Shark Week next week, did you know that shark corneas are very similar to the ones we humans have? As such, shark corneas have been used as replacements in human eye surgeries. Want to see Shark Week in all its gory glory? Check out some new lenses at Europtics today.

Shark Week at Europtics

Now that Memorial Day Weekend has come and gone, we are all excited about jumping back into the swimming pool. Most all of us will remember to bring the sunscreen, which is a good thing, but what are you doing to protect your eyes at the pool?

Did you know UV radiation increases as much as 25% when you are in or near the water? That is why we sunburn so easily poolside. That same UV radiation can be damaging to your eyesight as well, increasing your chances of acquiring cataracts, macular degeneration, or even skin cancer around the eyelids. That is why we carry a wonderful array of sunglasses that filter out those damaging UV rays. We have a complete line of sunglasses in both Rx and non-Rx to choose from.

The sun isn’t the only thing your eyes need to worry about at the pool, however. Pool chemicals can do a number on your eyes. The tear film that coats your eyes is one of nature’s magical wonders in that it’s the water, protein, and lipid combine to protect your eyes and keep them from drying out too quickly. Chlorine and saline, however, wreak havoc on your tear film, leading to redness and itching. These chemicals can also lead to Dry Eye Syndrome. If you wear contact lenses swimming, you are providing a surface for bacterial growth that can lead to complications such as corneal ulcers and in rare cases, vision loss.

This swim season we want to recommend you bring 3 things with you to the pool and 4 things back. The first is a good sunscreen that blocks both UVA and UVB rays. The second is a good pair of sunglasses that block 100% of UVA and UVB rays too. The third thing is a pair of swim goggles available at any sports or convenience store. That 4th thing to bring home is a wonderful smile of a fun, safe, and memorable day in the water.